Composition Program's Michael Ippolito's 'Nocturne' Premiere at Cabrillo Festival

Michael Ippolito

Composition Program's Michael Ippolito's 'Nocturne' Premiere at Cabrillo Festival

Music at the Mission: Harvest -  Sunday August 12, 4pm and 7pm – Mission San Juan Bautista

The 50th anniversary season of the Cabrillo Festival culminates with two Grand Finale performances at Mission San Juan Bautista.  The Festival Orchestra performs Michael Ippolito’s Nocturne, a work in three large sections. Michael Ippolito has collaborated with classical, folk and jazz musicians in performances ranging from experimental improvisation to traditional Klezmer music. Nocturne was originally inspired by Joan Miró’s 1940 painting of the same name.  Ippolito was struck by its “fantastical figures and swirling lines,” and by the tension between such “energy and whimsy” and the commonplace idea of night as a time of rest.  Composer John Mackey’s HarvestConcerto for Trombone is a work dedicated to and featuring Joseph Alessi on trombone.Harvest is based on the myths and mystery rituals of the Greek god Dionysus. Classical Review has described the piece as “a cycloramic feast of shifting moods and instrumental hues.” Alessi is known to Festival audiences for his remarkable West Coast premiere performance of Christopher Rouse's Pulitzer-Prize winning Trombone Concerto at Mission San Juan Bautista in 1994. Iranian composer Behzad Ranjbaran wowed audiences and critics at the Festival with his Concerto for Piano last year. Trained in Tehran and at the Juilliard School, Ranjbaran writes music that is lushly tonal and draws on the music and culture of his native Iran. This year Ranjbaran returns with Seven Passages, the final work of his Persian Trilogy, which draws its inspiration from “The Seven Trials of Rostam,” an episode in the national epic of Iran, the Shahnameh.  The concert closes with British composer Thomas Adès Polaris. The piece is named for Polaris, the North Star or Pole Star, around which the other stars appear to rotate as if it were itself a magnetic pole. Of this work, Joshua Kosman of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote, “there's a rapturous sheen to the score that makes it impossible to resist.”